Quintilian, whose full name was Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (35 - 96) was a Latin (Roman) teacher and writer whose work on rhetoric, Institutio oratoria, is a major contribution to educational theory and literary criticism.

Quintilian was born in northern Spain, but he was probably educated in Rome, where he received some practical training from Domitius Afer, the leading orator of the day. He then practiced for a time as an advocate in the law courts. Under the emperor Vespasian (ruled 69–79) he became the first teacher to receive a state salary for teaching Latin rhetoric, and he also held his position as Rome's leading teacher under the emperors Titus and Domitian, retiring probably in 88.

Quintilian's great work, the Institutio oratoria, in 12 books, was published shortly before the end of his life. He believed that the entire educational process, from infancy onward, was relevant to his major theme of training an orator. In Book I he therefore dealt with the stages of education before a boy entered the school of rhetoric itself, to which he came in Book II. These first two books contain his general observations on educational principles and are notable for their good sense and insight into human nature. Books III to XI are basically concerned with the five traditional "departments" of rhetoric: invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery. He also deals with the nature, value, origin, and function of rhetoric and with the different types of oratory, giving far more attention to forensic oratory (that used in legal proceedings) than to other types. During his general discussion of invention he also considers the successive, formal parts of a speech, including a lively chapter on the art of arousing laughter. Book X contains a well-known and much-praised survey of Greek and Latin authors, recommended to the young orator for study. Sometimes Quintilian agrees with the generally held estimate of a writer, but he is often independent in his judgments, especially when discussing Latin authors. Book XII deals with the ideal orator in action, after his training is completed: his character, the rules that he must follow in pleading a case, the style of his eloquence, and when he should retire.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Quintilian 1/4/18